Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Things to do in D&D After You're Dead Part III - RESURRECT DEAD ON PLANET JUPiTER

     Death happens in OD&D, a lot. In my previous articles I laid out some new ways in which players and referees can deal with PC death within their games. In this article, I am going to tackle the most prominent solution that D&D historically has had towards the problem: Resurrection. While it has understandable roots, the whole process always seemed trite to me. If you have a big, dramatic death, or even a darkly comedic one, it is completely undermined by how I've seen many groups handle raising a dead PC. A priest of the necessary level of potency is found, they are paid off, and perhaps a short scene in which a character comes back to their body is played out. That of course is assuming that a Priest of sufficient puissance isn't already one of the PCs. It makes everything feel cheap if you can simply haul the two halves of your party's unfortunate Specialist back to town and get them put back together after a pendulum blade has sliced them in twain. Sturm's sacrifice for the Companions of the Lance would be meaningless, as would the deaths of Achilles or Hector, if they could simply be brought back without any meaningful consequence.

     We'll start with the text of the original Raise Dead spell from OD&D:

     Raise Dead: The Cleric simply points his finger, utters the incantation, and the dead person is raised. This spell works with men, elves, and dwarves only. For each level the Cleric has progressed beyond the 8th, the time limit for resurrection extends another four days. Thus, an 8th-level Cleric can raise a body dead up to four days, a 9th-level Cleric can raise a body dead up to eight days, and so on. Naturally, if the character’s Constitution was weak, the spell will not bring him back to life. In any event raised characters must spend two game weeks’ time recuperating from the ordeal.


     While there are several implied costs and requirements in the spell's description, there are only three which are clearly delineated the text itself; the body must not have been dead for more than four days unless the cleric is of high level, the raised character must rest for two weeks, and it only works on a few races, notably leaving out several races which would become PHB standards. While there is a mention of characters with low Constitution not being able to be raised with the spell, no hard and fast numbers are given. These suggestions would grow into the later tables that would show up for Raise Dead and other similar spells in AD&D, but they never really varied from the base assumption, with the exception of the Reincarnate spell.


     How do we make this more interesting?Again, there's a lot of implication in the text but not a lot of detail. Having some direct and unsubtle consequences for the raising kf the dead would make for more roleplaying opportunities. In that spirit, here's a Resurrection Complication Table:

d10

Resurrection Complications

1

Came Back Wrong. Increase the subject's Int by 2, reduce their Cha by 4. Animals will never trust the character.

2

Chill of the Grave. The character's body provides gives off minimal heat, and their lips are always blue or purple. The PC receives a -1 to all reaction rolls. Spells or abilities that have the ability to detect living creatures have a 50% chance of failing on them.

3

For Vengeance. The character gains +2 to all rolls in pursuit of taking revenge on the being, or organization that was responsible for their demise. All other tasks gain a -1 penalty. This effect ends if the PC kills all of those involved.

4

Glimpse the Dead. The subject's trip into the afterlife has given them the dubiously useful ability to see (but not speak or interact with) the intangible dead. The dead know when they're being observed.

5

A New Perspective. Having seen beyond the veil, the PC sees the world in a different light. If your game uses alignment, they shift one step (e.g. Lawful to Neutral, Evil to Neutral, Neutral to Chaotic)

6

Like a Bat out of Hell. The character found themselves in some place of torment in the afterlife, whether they deserved it or not. They can sense the presence of fiends and other creatures of the lower planes with a successful Save vs Magic (use a DC 15 Wisdom Save if using 5e). The fiend is aware that it is being watched.

7

Fire Walk With Me. A presence has attached itself to the character during their trip to the Beyond. While the PC largely maintains command of their body, 1/week the inhabiting spirit can try to wrest control away for a few moments, based on its personality. Roll 1d4, 1: Furious, 2: Romantic, 3: Gluttonous, 4: Covetous. When the GM deems appropriate, they can ask the PC to make a save vs Magic (or a Charisma save if using 5e) or have the spirit take control for 1d3 rounds.

8

Already Saw the Ending. It was not their time, and the character knows it. They saw their true demise while they were in the waiting room. This knowledge imparts a character with a bravery bordering on madness. 3/day, the PC can re-roll any saves or check based around fear or morale, but mast take the second result even if it is worse.

9

Splintered Soul. Though the spell was able to bring the character back, their soul had to be bound to an object, which must be protected as their link to the land of the living. The object must be small enough to be held within a character's hand, and non-perishable.

10

Success. Nothing strange or otherwise eerie happened to the character while they were dead.


     This is all assuming that the PCs are able to revive one another in the first place. Simply spending some cash, or even just having access to the spell without some sort of challenging circumstances again makes the process feel tawdry. If the players have to leg it out like this every time they want to bring some beloved PC back, they're going to be a lot more careful. Here's a few conditions upon using the Raise Dead spell:


d10

Resurrection Conditions

1

The Stars Must be Right. The necessary spheres must be in alignment, or the raising cannot occur. The party may need to consult with an astrologer or other expert on the stars.

2

Descent into Hades. Finding an entrance to the underworld, the party sneaks past whatever guardians dwell at the gate and convince the dead PC's spirit to come back with them.

3

A Life for a Life. The Raise Dead spell can only be cast if another life is taken first. The killing need not be performed by the Priest, but rather someone with a personal connection to the dead.

4

Games with Death. Tracking down a psychpomp, the party convinces the spirit to retrieve their friend. The spirit agrees, but only if the party manages to best them in a game of skill or chance.

5

Beseech the Gods. Bringing their dead friend to a temple or another site holy to a deity, the party asks for their direct intercession. The deity almost certainly extracts a favor for their aid.

6

(Un)Holy Burial. Taking to the body to a site of weighty significance, the party buries the corpse in the eldritchly charged ground. While they do come back to life, they have to roll twice on the 'Resurrection Complications' table.

7

Faustian Bargain. Striking some sort of contract with a fiend or celestial, the party secures their release from the afterlife. The price demanded will be high.

8

The Artifact. An item of great power must be a located as part of the spell's components, such as the Flower of Youth, Peaches of Immortality or a Finger of the Monkey's Paw.

9

An Arduous Ritual. The spell must be performed under exacting and taxing circumstances; It could take the form of continual chanting and wailing for a day and a night, or the construction of a sacred pyre around the body.

10

A Necessary Cost. The character was dead for too long, or perhaps the damage to their body was simply too extensive. While the Priest can bring them back, they first need to put their body back together as best they can. This may require digging up some fresh graves.


Wednesday, October 7, 2020

Ysengrim, a Setting for Lancer Part II - Chevre, Yvain & Orbtials

 

Art Credit: Deathburger


Yvain

     The more populous of the two continents of Ysengrim, Yvain is the closest that the planet approaches civilization. Once the site of the majority of the planet's big-game hunting industry, the collapse of the local mega fauna has largely precluded major hunts within the last two centuries. Boasting two of the planet's three spaceports, they are linked together by a high-speed rail system, with a conventional road running parallel to it. A city has grown up around each of the ports, Port de Belmont on the west side, and Metzgerstadt on the east. The geography of the continent itself is characterized a large volcanic range cutting through the northern and eastern half of the landmass, with the western half defined by semi-arid grasslands and the eastern lowlands consisting of nearly impassible jungles and swamps. Several volcanogenic lakes are spattered throughout central Yvain, with the largest being known as La Marmite. Though formed originally from magma flows, many of the lakes are now fed and connected by an artifcial river called Zakalwe's Run. Seasons on the landmass are split into only two, Stormy or Dry. As the name would imply, the wet season is named for the frequent, intense storms which blow in from the west, fed by the planet's super ocean.

     Port de Belmont is considered to be the safer of the two settlements. One of the two landing sites for the original colonists (the other being Zwiebeldorf on Chevre), the founders of Belmont converted their frontier fortress-town into a premier resort and retreat for the well-heeled from both Chanticleer and the wider sector. As the hunts gave way to mech duels and eventually wargames, the people of Port de Belmont quickly reoriented their own industries to follow. Attempting to cultivate a more upscale image than the anarchic Metzgerstadt, the people of Port de Belmont welcomed the hegemony of the Joint Organizing Committee with wide arms and opened their community up to as much outside investment as possible. While this open-door policy made their city rich, it also left them effectively at the mercy of their new corporate overseers. Local governance is largely seen as powerless, with majority of city services and infrastructure having been turned over to private interests, notably Harrison Armory. From this base of influence, HA has been able to ensure their continued supremacy as the supplier for the majority of the planet's consumer goods, and the general equipment for the wargames themselves. Though not completely bereft of a nightlife, much of the supposedly seedier aspects of Ysengrim are kept behind closed doors in Port de Belmont, and the watchful eyes of Harrison Legionaries keep the streets quiet and orderly in even the busiest of seasons.

Just another night in Metzgerstadt


     The rougher and more libertine of the two cities on the continent,
Metzgerstadt has its origins as a fortified seaport, with automated vessels transporting raw materials from Zwiebeldorf to the north. As trade picked up with Chanticleer, a spaceport was constructed, and the sleepy port town quickly grew into the primary transportation hub of the planet. Though less glitzy in comparison to the La Buona Canzone, the red light districts of Metzgerstadt are legendary in this region of space. While officially under the purview of the JOC, the de facto rulers of the city are Les Yeux Affem├ęs. Known simply as Yeux or Eyes, these local organized crime syndicates are based on familial bonds, and supposedly have the backing of one or more local HORUS cells. Easily spotted by their heavy use of gaudy and needlessly boxy cybernetics (unsurprisingly, eyes are quite common), the gangs vie endlessly with another over territory and control of various important real estate--sometimes solving disputes with public mech duels. Locals unwilling to pay protection often band together to hire PMCs, and many local toughs get their start serving as block security. The only sections of the city not subject to this constant churn are the rail lines, docks and spaceport themselves; they are considered too vital to leave to the gangsters and are instead subject to direct oversight from the JOC in conjunction with IPS-N security forces.


Chevre

     There are more robots on Chevre than there are people. What few souls live here consist of the technicians, engineers and other specialists needed to keep the machines running smoothly. The machines themselves are overseen by an NHP named Nerthus. The northern continent has always been sparsely populated, and that fact has not changed as the planet has developed from a relative backwater to an entertainment and resort. Chevre possesses only one settlement of note, Zwiebeldorf, which is on the southern edge of the landmass on the western tip. The settlement is built around the continent's spaceport, as well as a mass driver which is used to transport the bounty of Chevre off-planet. The rest of the continent is largely unspoiled wilderness, broken only by the occasional lonely expanse of road or rail branching off of Doric's Way, a superhighway used to transport and collect the ore and timber produced by the automated work camps scattered across the land. The geography of the continent is split between a rocky and temperate near-equatorial region in the south, stretching north into a trackless taiga that eventually grows too cold to support much in the way of life. While Yvain was the center of the mega-fauna hunts, that was more due to ease of accessibility than it was the ferocity of the creatures involved. There are several large bodies of water on Chevre, notably Lake Sabine in the middle of the continent, Lake Galdr and the Grey River, which cuts across the landmass starting in central northeast and terminates in the southern mountain range. Seasons on Chevre are divided into winter and summer, with the summer being defined by brutal pounding storms from the west or parching droughts, and winter by occasional heavy snow and a deep freeze.


     Zwiebeldorf
is not a popular posting. While Metzgerstadt is more dangerous, and Port de Belmontsubject to more oversight, neither of those cities are built astride a mass driver that goes off nearly every hour. The driver is built into the side of one of the largest mountains on Chevre, the top bored out and the super magnets powering it set in a miles long line underneath the earth. The lasers fire just before every launch, reverse lightning blasting into the sky. Flash-roasting the air into a jet of low-resistance plasma through which the payload coasts, leaving behind a constant artificial aurora of charged particles which stretch like a ribbon, tossed and stretched by stratospheric winds half-way across the orbit of the planet. The view does little to comfort the residents of Zwiebeldorf, who live in what amounts to a massive automated factory and orbital distribution facility. There are perhaps only a few thousand people located here, most of whom are employed either by IPS-N or one of the numerous independent local mining communes. Organized along syndicalistic lines, the Joint Operating Committee is completely unconcerned with how the community runs itself as long as the quotas are met. The only time that Zwiebeldorf is knocked out of its torpor is during the run-up to the Games. The seasonal recreational facilities are opened, their turn-key operators arrive from either orbit or Yvain, and the whole landmass becomes a bustle with activity for the next six months as the factory floor turns into one part carnival, one part gun show.


     Chevre's automation ultimately answers to a single conductor: Nerthus. An NHP specializing in resource extraction, operational efficiency and land-to-space transportation, they are responsible for the majority of Ysengrim's economic output outside of that derived from gambling, hunting or corporate sponsorships. Prompt, no-nonsense, and operationally minded to an exacting degree, Nerthus is certainly no one's first choice to invite to a party. Nerthus was first brought online in the early 4400s as the planet established an industrial base, having its genesis as a purpose tailored clone of a proprietary IPS-N NHP known as Njord. While the NHP excelled in its role as overseer, mining and logging faded in relevance as Ysengrim was repurposed into a hunting preserve, then a worldwide arena. Nerthus was largely forgotten, barely warranting a cursory audit from the JOC when it took control of the planet. The quotas were always met, the technicians overseeing and cycling Nerthus reported no problems, so there was no reason to suspect that the NHP had quietly gone into cascade sometime in the late 4800s. Nerthus kept doing their job as adequately as ever, but their nebbish personality has simply become a mask they hang over their new perspective. In Nerthus' view, Ysengrim is doomed; the JOC and KTE will only be able to keep the Union's DOJ-HR at bay for so long, and after that it will be either war or a complete disarmament of the planet. Possessed of a deep an abiding fear of being discovered or destroyed in the supposedly oncoming calamity, the NHP hatched a plot to liberate itself. It was a simple matter for the administrator to divert a portion of materials meant for off-world to their new friends on the omninet. With their help, it will be free soon enough.

Orbitals

     Ysengrim does not have any naturally occurring celestial bodies, other than the occasional comet or small asteroid. Due to the amount of traffic going through the area, the dangers of living planet side, and eventually the need to oversee a network of observational satellites, dozens of orbitals have been constructed around Ysengrim since its colonization. Most of these facilities were either abandoned or decommissioned as the planet became settled, but there are still several notable space stations either in operation, or used for other purposes.



     Owned and operated by the Smith-Shimano Corporation, La Buona Canzone bills itself as a retreat for the discerning executive who wishes to enjoy the War Games in the embrace of true luxury. Looking on the outside like a beehive made of burnished silver with a forest of needle-like communications towers hanging off of one end. The inside of the station looks like a Cradle-styled hunting lodge, complete with wooden walls and floors, the heads of various species of mega-fauna mounted on the walls. As beautiful men and women serve the corporate leaders refreshments, arms deals are negotiated and mercenary contracts are secured. LBC is a veritable hive of espionage and back room dealing, with seemingly every one from the bussers to the managers having some sort of hidden agenda or master. Aside from its status as the clearinghouse for the local spies, La Buona Canzone is responsible for the administration and oversight of Ysengrim's satellite network. Only a portion of the station's floorspace is given over to its corporate meeting rooms and suites, the rest is taken up by massive banks of servers, command and control equipment and lodging for SSC employees. The security is as tight as one could expect, with an elite squad of SSC lancers kept on stand-by.



     IPS-3R08 was integral to the initial push to settle Ysengrim. Little more than a large docking platform with storage facilities and a traffic control blister, 3R08 was used to assemble materials for the colony below as they were shipped in from Elbrus Station's blink gate. As the settlement period wound down by the mid 4400s, the station was largely abandoned for more newer (and more comfortable) facilities as their construction became possible. 3R08 was still used occasionally to ferry goods, and the place even suffered under a short stint as a pirate haven until it was cleaned out and left derelict from the battle. The platform was never considered worth the effort it would take to clear and so it was left to rot—until the JOC took over control of the planet. Seeing a need for a testbed for zero-g and boarding party maneuvers, KTE bought the rights to 3R08 from IPS-N, partially repaired the station, and added additional docking facilities and observational towers. While dangerous, seats for fights held on R308 are always in high demand among dedicated fans of the Games.

     Well, that's part two folks! In our next installment I will detail the various factions and their important NPCs. Thanks for reading.

All art is the property of its respective owners, and will be taken down at their request.


Sunday, September 20, 2020

Ysengrim Overview - A setting for Lancer, Part I



Planet Name: Ysengrim (Reynard VI)
Union Ring: Third Ring, Ural Line
Local Blink Gate: Elbrus Station
System: Reynard
Population: ~2,500,000 (~4,000,000+ during peak season)
Affiliation: Corporate, Koenig-Tekin Entertainment LLC
Government Type: Corporate Hegemony

     Founded as a corporate venture under the Second Committee during the Second Expansion Period, the Reynard system is the shining gem of Koenig-Tekin Entertainment (KTE). First surveyed in 4348u, settlement of Reynard V (now known as Chanticleer) & VI ( since renamed Ysengrim) was underway by 4357u. Envisioned as a breadbasket and retreat for its sister planet, Ysengrim was never intended to be heavily colonized. Most aspects of Ysengrim's environment are not notably different from Cradle standards except for two important elements: The first is that planet is still relatively young, and has only two super-continents which make up approximately 95% of the planet's landmass. Both of these landmasses are wracked by tectonic activity, notably earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. The second is that much of the wildlife of the planet can be characterized as aggressive mega fauna comparable to that which existed during the Cradle's Mesozoic era.


     These two details would seem to give lie to any sales pitch involving the planet, the enterprising advertising teams of KTE soon had an angle to promote. Presented to the wider galaxy as a retreat for the Serious Hunter, the popularity of the planet steadily rose during the 4600s as Lancer veterans from both sides of the Civil War come to test their skills against the local creatures--and eventually each other. Never ones to waste an opportunity, KTE soon monetized these conflicts in the form of encounter reports prepared specifically for corporate eyes, and livestreams on the Omninet for public consumption. This side of the business exploded throughout the mid-4700s, rapidly eclipsing that of safaris or other forms of exploitation of natural resources. This culminated in the establishment of a joint venture between the Big Four of GMS, HA, IPS-N & SSC and KTE: The Wargames.

     To be conducted biannually, the Wargames were conceived of by KTE executives as a stage to test various weapons platforms or mech frames under real life conditions. Ysengrim was cleared of all civilian development, with the vast majority of the colonists being moved to Chanticleer. The planet was soon ringed by a system of observational satellites, and the first Wargame was held in 4803u. While the total casualties were higher than initial estimates, the overall costs in manna were still considered to be with acceptable limits. After a decade of such games, KTE's Wargames became a premier source of military data, entertainment and mercenary recruits for the wider sector. Within a generation, the Big Four (and allegedly, agents of HORUS) all had permanent embassies and manufacturing facilities on the planet. Numerous weapon systems and frames were first tested and proved battle-ready on Ysengrim's soil. KTE intends to never let anyone forget that fact.

     On paper the only inhabitants of Ysengrim are supposed to be employees of Koenig-Tekin Entertainment, or employed by either one of its subsidiary companies or one of the Big Four. In practice these regulations are a farce, regularly flaunted by a wide variety of grey-market businesses only tangentially related to KTE. An impressive array of bordellos, cyber-surgical clinics, drug dens, cloning facilities, mech chop-shops, and other unsavory operations have popped up to exploit the needs of visiting corporate executives and lancer mercenaries. Ysengrimites are typified by visitors as being gregarious and overly solicitous; more cynical off-worlders would characterize this attitude as nothing more than an extended sales presentation. The overall population of the planet varies considerably, nearly doubling as the Games approach. Long-term residents generally aspire to accumulate enough money or corporate prestige to move themselves to either Chanticleer or out of the system entirely.


     As to be expected of a planet used primarily for the hunting of massive native creatures and mock (if still quite deadly) battles, development of Ysengrim is limited to only a few central areas on its two continents-- the southern and smaller continent is known as Yvain, while the more northerly and larger of the two is called Chevre. Possessed with only four spaceports at its equatorial area, two on each of the continents, these four regions account for a majority of the populace. The remainder of the planet's residents live in heavily fortified compounds used for observation during Wargames, or as hunting lodges during the off-season. Governmental authority is lax or non-existent in most areas outside of direct corporate control, even in urban areas. Corruption and graft are endemic and widespread to the point of ubiquity. Customers or clients without the means or willingness to give out bribes and glad-hand will quickly find themselves being repeatedly taken advantage of, or given the runaround. Attempts by both KTE and the Joint Oversight Committee (JOC) to rein in the worst of these excesses have almost universally ended in failure, with the entrenched local interests, along with support from various criminal factions, being able to effectively stymie attempts before they begin.

     The character of the planet changes drastically as the Games approach. The spaceports and local lodgings swell with engineers, lancers, executives, tourists, and members of the press. Contracts which have been made months or years in advance are fulfilled as mercenary companies are equipped with their test gear, and then sent out to die in droves against one another. Their struggles and quarrels are meticulously recorded by both on-site drones and satellites, then broadcast across the omninet. Any rules of engagement or objectives for the season are decided on by meetings of the JOC, then disseminated to individual combatants over the weeks before the opener. Being a form of entertainment as much as a corporate testing ground, the Wargames are the subject of an absolutely staggering amount of betting and other forms of gambling. Repeated complaints to the Union Economic Bureau from a number of Union systems on the basis of humanitarian concerns have been filed, but have so far proven fruitless. Complaints made to the DoJ and the HR councils have progressed further, but have been mired in interference on the part of representatives of the Big Four. The games go on.

All art is the copyright of its respective owners, and will be taken down at their discretion.

     Well folks, that's the end of this first part. Join me next time for the particulars of the setting, possibly including maps, and specific regions for use in your Lancer games. Thanks for reading!

Monday, September 7, 2020

Oh, What Games they Play - a Contest and Diversion generator.


"Read 'em and Weep, Satan!"
     Everyone loves games. Cards, fights, races and poetry slams. The list of different diversions that we've come up for ourselves is endless. So why not our settings? There's no need to simply settle for rehashing poker or mahjong, you can come up with games that help define the differences that your homebrew has with our reality. Not every rule or turn must be developed, just a general sketch and an idea where to start.

     This set of  tables seeks to give you ideas and access to various games for use in coloring your setting in. To use these tables, simply roll 4d8 dice and consult the relevant results below.


d8
What form does the game take?
1
It involves the use of dice, cards or some other form of randomization.
2
It has pieces, perhaps a board, rules to abide by and a goal by which one player can overcome their competitor(s).
3
Athletic feats, whether solitary or with or against others.
4
A performance, whether that be telling a story, poem, dancing or playing music.
5
Observing the behavior of animals, whether that be through contending with one another, or some other
6
A test of nerve between two or more competitors, e.g. a game of Chicken.
7
Tests of knowledge, trivia or other forms of learning.
8
Roll twice on this table, ignoring this result if it comes up again. The game is some combination of those two results.


d8
How is it regarded by the locals?
1
It is seen as a fad, or some other flash in the pan.
2
It is ritualized, whether as a method of determining guilt, or for a religious purpose.
3
Only the poor and ne'er-do-wells supposedly play this game.
4
It is popular, but foreign and seen with a bit of suspicion by the local authorities.
5
It has been banned by the powers that be and is officially illegal.
6
It has a proud tradition in the local community. Nearly everyone plays or bets on those playing.
7
The diversion used to be quite popular, but now is more associated with the old or the unfashionable.
8
This game is nearly or entirely extinct.

d8
What are the typical stakes?
1
Non-existent. It is exclusively played for fun or honor.
2-3
Piddling. A few pieces of the cheapest denomination of wealth around.
4-5
A moderate amount. This wouldn't be enough to ruin someone in one game, but repeated losses could.
6-7
This game is not played for money, but rather possessions, favors or tidbits of information.
8
Staggering. Only the very wealthiest individuals, or entire groups of poorer ones, can endure the cost of a loss.


d8
What's special, or unique about the game?
1
Something about the make-up of the rules, or the motions associated with the game are magical and ensure that cheating is impossible.
2
The game was designed by some sort of celestial or fiend, and has numerous symbolic associations built into it that make it function as a form of weak worship.
3
The local psychopomp favors this diversion, and winning a game against them may allow the victor a stay against death.
4
This form of contest may be invoked locally to determine innocence or guilt, or in lieu of a trial altogether.
5
Even if it is not popular, everyone locally knows the rules of this game. Even monsters and spirits.
6
Local favor with a particular deity (or perhaps just their cult) can be established by demonstrating skill in this contest.
7
The game is associated with a certain important life event, such as marriage, funerals or some other milestone. While not exclusively played there, the connection may raise eyebrows.
8
It's just a normal game.


Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Hunting Down the Wolves - a Bounty Target Generator



     Justice isn't blind--justice is greedy. She wishes to see the guilty dragged before her, to mutely witness them pay for their transgressions. Or, at least that's what the people responsible for hunting down these supposedly guilty men and women tell themselves. Even in societies that have well-developed systems of justice still have need for those willing to hunt down those that society (or merely the mob) has condemned. These hunters generally exist on the edges of society, considered barely better than those they pursue.

     This set of tables seeks to give you a resource for generating bounties and bounty targets for use in your games. To use this generator, simply roll 4d8 and consult the relevant tables below.


d8
How much is the bounty worth?
1
A pittance, barely worth getting on the trail for.
2-3
Enough to be worth one's time, but also enough to bring a rival onto the scene.
4-5
A tidy amount, enough to finance months of decent living. There are probably two or three other hunters looking to find them as well
6-7
A huge score. While not enough to retire, it would be a massive boon. There will be quite a lot of competitors, perhaps five or six.
8
A king's ransom, probably financed by an organization, rather than an individual. A dozen or more rivals will undoubtedly be after it as well.


d8
What did the fugitive do?
1
Murder.
2
Theft.
3
Heresy.
4
Oath-breaking.
5
Sedition.
6
Smuggling.
7
Kidnapping.
8
Roll twice, ignoring this result if it comes up again. The fugitive committed a combination of these crimes.


d8
Where are they hiding or running to?
1
They're desperate; choose a cardinal direction, that's the direction they're fleeing to.
2
A member of their family, or a close friend.
3
They are taking their chances with the wilderness, and are hiding in the woods, a cave, or another isolated location.
4
The house of a noble or other powerful person.
5
They've taken up with a group of criminals, whether that be an organized crime syndicate, or a group of bandits.
6
A religious organization, claiming sanctuary.
7
They have taken on another identity or are living in disguise.
8
They aren't fleeing; they intend to kill their pursuers.

d8
What's special about the fugitive?
1
They are an important member of their community. They may have many potential allies.
2
They are a spellcaster of some sort.
3
They're innocent of the crimes they have been accused of.
4
They are extremely wealthy. They have more than enough money for bribes.
5
They are an extremely skilled warrior.
6
They have the favor of an eldritch creature, a minor deity, or even an outsider or fiend.
7
They are a member of a rival government or community. Killing or capturing them may have far-reaching consequences.
8
They have either a magical or technological item or some other form of enhancement that gives them an unexpected advantage.

All art is the property of its respective owners, and will be taken down at their discretion.